Technical Tours

 

Boischatel’s karst topography and Montmorency Falls’ geology

Date: Thursday, September 24th, 2015
Departing and returning time (from and to) Québec's Convention Center: 8:30 AM and 5:30 PM
Registration fees: $ 150 before August 1st 2015 ($ 165 after August 1st 2015)
Number of participants: Limited to 18
 
In June 2013, problematic terrain subsidence in Courville, a suburb of Quebec city, led to the evacuation of four apartment buildings and forced some twenty families onto the streets. These sinkholes were due to karstic processes following groundwater flow in the Trenton limestone formation about 460 million years old in the area.   

This one-day field excursion in Boischatel near Courville, about 15 minutes away from Quebec city, will be a unique opportunity to visit the natural caves of Boischatel as well as many other karstic features such as dolines, water losses along the Ferrée river, the dry river bed of the Ferrée river and water resurgences along the Montmorency river. Moreover, the tour will guide us to one of the most spectacular site of Quebec city: the  Montmorency Falls, where a stunning 80 m-high waterfall results from a normal fault between the Grenville  and the St. Lawrence Platform.

*For the visit of the caves, please bring your waterproof boots and coat. Prepare to get muddy! Not recommended to claustrophobic people. Safety gear (helmet and headlight) will be provided.

       
 

Risk Analysis and risk management in the Charlevoix region
 
Date: Thursday, September 24th, 2015
Departing and returning time (from and to) Québec's Convention Center: 8:30 AM and 5:30 PM
Registration fees: 150 $ before August 1st 2015, 165 $ after August 1st 2015.
Number of participants: Limited to 25
 
This all-day excursion will take place in Charlevoix, designated a World Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO in 1988. Located about a hundred kilometers north-east of Quebec city, along the St-Lawrence River, this area is the second strongest seismic zone in Canada, after Vancouver. Five earthquakes of magnitude higher than 6 were reported in recent history, including a major event in 1663, with an estimated magnitude of 7.5. That event triggered some very large landslides in the marine clay deposits that are found in the two main valleys of the area and along the coast of the St.Lawrence River. Important liquefaction phenomena associated with the 1870 earthquake (M 6.4) were also documented, particularly along the Du Gouffre river. The technical tour will be an opportunity to study the impacts of these earthquakes on the lands of Charlevoix and to present various mitigation strategies against geological risks. The excursion will also be an opportunity to discuss mapping of landslide-prone areas and to visit some sites affected by active erosion along the Du Gouffre river, where landslides often occur.

The visit of Charlevoix will combine geological and geotechnical aspects, along with risk analysis, risk management, and, of course, local gastronome delights.